Category Archives: Business Branding

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Allow Me To REINTRODUCE Myself


To my new followers, my name is Brian K. Wyatt Jr., Founder and Creative Director of B-EZ Graphix, Inc. I come to you with over 9 years of experience in graphic design, web design and strategic marketing. If you can imagine, my business has undergone many transformations over the years. Rebranding a company is hard – many have tried and most fail for various reasons. A successful rebranding campaign requires much more than a new look and logo. Although we do hope you enjoy our new look, it is most important to us that you have the most productive and enjoyable experience with our staff and services. It is our every intention to show that our rebranding comes with more than just a new aesthetic.

Rebranding has become something of a fad at the turn of the millennium. In many instances, rebranding is done to shed a negative image. We assure you, that is not the case with B-EZ Graphix. Our efforts to rebrand are done for the same reason reptiles shed skin – growth. To differentiate ourselves from our competitors, we wanted to show the fruits of our growth – new and improved skill sets, currency in design trends and styles, powerful network and inspiring partnerships. Consider the way Target rebranded in order to differentiate itself from low-brow stores like Wal-Mart and K-Mart, by including pared down versions of designer apparel. In this way, we are finding new ways to stand out. In addition, we wish to make our business identity and mission more pronounced:

B-EZ Graphix is veteran-owned, freelance graphic design, web design and marketing agency. Our mission is to encourage entrepreneurship by simplifying the marketing and brand development process for start up business and organizations. In addition, we support the rebranding and strategic marketing efforts of established enterprises.

Our identity and mission brings us closer to our clients and our target market. We seek to capitalize on this new disposition by enhancing our connections and creating the most positive customer experience for our clients. The rebranding campaign of Old Spice is an illustrative example of what I mean. Whereas, Old Spice, once a brand many associated with their grandfather’s deodorant, now has a fresh identity following clever marketing of a manly “experience” and smart use of social media to connect with their consumers – all done without changing their logo. Old Spice has reaped the benefits of evoking the social connotations of “swagger” as opposed to just simply charisma…Although, I’m sure former NFL player Isaiah Mustafa’s influence on wives and girlfriends was also very encouraging.

So as we finalize our latest rebranding campaign, we encourage you all to take advantage of our design and marketing services, provide feedback and assist us with ensure we offer the best services at the most reasonable rates. Moreover, we encourage other entrepreneurs to also consider a robust rebranding campaign if you have been in business for a considerable amount of time and feel that you are falling out of touch with your target market. In conclusion, I hope that this blog post makes it clear why we chose to rebrand. We look forward to serving you and showing you the difference.

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Typography Basics: Understanding the Language of Letters


Sometimes the toughest part of getting started with a first design project can be understanding the language of design. Typographers, for example, have a whole language of their own that relates to type, fonts and design.

To have an open and successful conversation in your next design meeting, it will help to fully understand the lingo when talking about type. Here’s your primer.

Fonts and Strokes

Fonts and Strokes

What is a font anyway?

A font is a complete set of characters of a specific size and style from one typeface. A typeface is a group of letters, characters, symbols and punctuation of the same style. Helvetica, for example, is a typeface; whereas 9-point Helvetica is a font. All of the options – bold, italic, light, etc – make up a type family.

The distinction is often ignored by most designers (both for web and print) and the terms font and typeface are often used interchangeably.

Stroke: The weight of each line in a letter. Strokes were originally identified in handwritten lettering as each time the pen came off the paper to create the next line. Letters can have only one stroke, or be created using multiple strokes.

Point: Unit that relates to the measured size of a font. There are 72 points in each vertical inch of type.

Condensed: Property of type in which each letterform is made using narrow proportions. These typefaces can be made using a series of thin or thick strokes.

Bold: Type style in which each stroke is heavier than the normal stroke for a certain typeface.

Italics: Type style in which each letter is slanted (most commonly to the right) more than the normal typeface.

Subscript: Smaller letters or numbers that fall slightly below the baseline. In most instances this text is somewhat smaller than the preceding letters. (Commonly, a subscript is about 60 percent of the size of lettering around it.)

Superscript: Smaller letters or numbers that sit above the normal line of type. In most instances this text is somewhat smaller than the preceding letters. (Commonly, a superscript is about 60 percent of the size of lettering around it.)

Initial or drop cap: A large or decorative letter used to begin a block of text.

Brooklyn Beta

Brooklyn Beta

Black Estate Vineyard

Black Estate Vineyard

Weareo3

Weareo3

Kiawah Island

Kiawah Island

Parts of a Letter

Line and Letter Spacing

Letters have a lingo of their own as well. All of the tiny parts, from curls to connecting letters, to the bottom of a lowercase “y” have a name. An understanding and study of these parts can help typographers identify fonts and can help designers choose what typefaces may work best for a project.

X-height: The height of a lowercase “x” in each font. The x-height is used as a measure of typefaces, relating to other parts of letterforms.

Cap height: The uppermost height of letters in a typeface. This may also be called the ascender height or topline.

Beardline: The lowermost point of letters in a typeface. This may also be called the descender height and it will fall below the baseline.

Ascender: The part of a letter (upper- or lowercase)that is higher than the x-height.

Descender: The part of a lowercase letter that falls below the baseline.

Serif: Any stroke that extends from the ends of a letter form. Any type face containing serifs is called a serif font.

Sans serif: Typefaces that do not contain serifs.

Ligature: The effect when two or more letterforms connect to form a single element. Letters combinations such as “fi,” and “fl” often form ligatures in certain typefaces.

Stem: The primary vertical stroke in a letter.

Tail: The end stroke of a letter. Often a tail refers to a decorative stroke.

Crossbar: A horizontal stroke than connects two vertical or slanted strokes in a letter, such as the line in the middle of “A.”

Bowl: Any fully-closed section of a letter. The center of an “o” in most typefaces is a bowl.

Line and Letter Spacing

Line and Letter Spacing

Spacing matters too. Some designers would even argue that the spacing above, below and around letters can be just as important as the letterforms themselves.

Baseline: The horizontal line where text rests, excluding descenders. In many traditional typefaces, every capital and lowercase letter will line up along a common baseline.

Leading: The space between two lines of text is called leading (line-height in CSS). The measure is from baseline to baseline. Often text applications will default to leading that is equal to the point size; designers often change this measure to best fit their typographic style.

Kerning: The space between any two given characters and the adjustment of that space is called kerning. (Some may confuse this with tracking, which adjusts the space between all characters, not just letter pairs.) Certain combinations of letters often require kerning to achieve a certain look – think of the space combinations between “AV” and “We.”

Tracking: The space between groups of characters, or words, is measured as tracking (letter-spacing in CSS). Negative tracking pulls text closer together while positive tracking pushes letters apart. Tracking set at 0 is as

Pica: Common in print publication, picas are used to measure lines of text vertically. There are 12 points per pica (and six picas per inch)

Measure: The amount of space used by a column of type horizontally. In other words, the width of a column of type as it appears on the screen (or in print). Typically a measure relates to the number of characters per line. A good rule of thumb for determining point size is that a single column of text contains 40-50 characters per line, while multiple columns of text can contain up to 75 characters per line.

south & eleven

south & eleven

EpicDiscovery

EpicDiscovery

WeMake

WeMake

Reaching Quiet

Reaching Quiet

Source: http://designmodo.com/typography-basics/#ixzz27VsXmFlV

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What Do You Know About Letterpress?


Letterpress printing is a technique in which the design is actually pressed into the paper, resulting in an embossed or raised finish. Because of the time it takes to create and produce a letterpressed design, it’s not common to see it done on a large scale – instead, it’s the smaller, very high quality design shops that are the ones who may choose the technique instead.

Letterpressed designs introduce a new feel and finish to a design – a slightly different texture and shading that sets it apart from other prints. However, it can also be very challenging – letterpress equipment tends to only be able to print in one colour at a time, which means that it needs a very skilled operator indeed if they are to produce art in more than one colour (something that isn’t an issue for those more used to regular printing processes).

Despite the quirks and intricacies involved with learning how to use letterpress equipment, the results can be – when done perfectly – visually stunning. We’ve selected a showcase of some beautiful letterpress designs to hopefully inspire you and perhaps get you thinking about adding letterpress designing to your list of skills.

Loves you card

underconsideration.com

irwin and mclaren

benjennings.com.au

Sockeye

designspiration.net

Rogers Reel

mattsoncreative.com

Art Is good for You

flickr.com/photos/crankypressman

Bespoke Letterpress Boutique

thefinderskeepers.com

VH1 Classic

ilovedust.com

Zoo Titling

dribbble.com

Space Camp

eighthourday.com

Anand design

graphic-exchange.com

DGPH

letterpressed.blogspot.com

Shyama Golden

lovelystationery.com

We are manic

designspiration.net

Wasted Time

etsy.com

Letter press

jigscafe.blogspot.com

Are there any beautiful letterpress designs that you’ve found that deserve a mention? Let us know in the comments.

NYC Day 1: Illi Boy at Ilili


Two shuttles after landing at Laguardia, I arrived at my grungy hotel, the Latham on 28th Street. I unloaded and immediate began to explore the city on foot. With my virtual assistant, Gaila Curry of the Expert Offices, in ear on my Bluetooth, I soon realized that it had been over 8 hours since I last ate. Gaila then directed me to the Ilili a few blocks south of where I had wandered.

Upon entering, the mirrored foyer and walls dressed in golden drapery evoked images of a Mediterranean palace. But as a designer, I was still fascinated by the logo that greeted me as I approached the restaurant. It was simple, elegant and told the whole story about what was in store for me inside. I had the option of sitting at a traditionally set table, but I could resist the allure of dining in the leather lounge area beside the stone slab table tops. Typically, this is a setting for groups, especially because of its proximity to the bar. Nevertheless, I was determined to indulge in the experience for myself. And indulge I did. I opened with a traditional hummus appetizer, as my waitress advised me of the differences between the two main courses that I was torn between: The Lamb Chops and the Citrus Trout. She admonished that the trout was for those who were looking for something different, and suggested the Lamb due to its simplicity. My travel tradition is to do something different each time I visit someplace different. So, I ordered the Citrus Trout alongside a Lebanese white wine.

After grazing over the pita pillows and hummus, I was introduced to a frightening presentation of the trout. Not unlike the rubbish on the street when I first laid eyes on the city of New York on trash day. Also, the dish was so flat that I was afraid my appetite would turn me inside out at the dissatisfaction of finishing the meal too soon. . . This was all an illusion. As I dove into the inside of the fish, I saw that it was not only meaty, but meaty on both sides and dressed with greens in between. With the orange citrus cells, the fish was mild, yet sweet and tangy. Accompanied with the grapefruit citrus cells, the dish had the audacity to bite back. The citrus tahini underneath provided me with a smooth transition between the two contrasting experiences. A nibble of the crispy almonds also provided a much needed reprise. In aggregate, I couldn’t have asked for a better precursor to what awaits me in New York. My first meal was symbolic of the culture I would soon be immersed within. Thanks to the Expert Offices for the outstanding recommendation, and thanks to Ilili for such an enchanting prelude to my adventures in the Big Apple.

5 Tips to Jump Start Your Brand


Hello, again! I will be posting my 5 Tips to Jump Start Your Brand. Follow these useful tips to get started with an effective brand marketing orientation to gain exposure.

TIP 1 – Get A Logo! Your logo is the face of your business. It’s the statement about your business that you want to give. Hire a graphic designer to design your logo because professional branding work yields better results. Make sure your logo excites you with pride because it sets the tone for the rest of your branding products. The style, colors and graphic elements will resonate in the rest of your brand products. Next, be sure to TRADEMARK YOUR LOGO! You should understand the value of protecting your business identity the same way you would with your own personal identity.

TIP 2 – Determine Your Niche to narrow the focus of your business branding campaigns. For example, a instead of marketing yourself as a “photographer,” brand yourself as a “wedding photographer.” A niche gives your brand orientation toward a target market – DON’T be a “Jack-of-all-trades; Master of none.” Master a niche to build a reputation -your brand. In other words, what you’re known to be proficient at providing for your target market.

TIP 3 – Establish Your Network! Build relationships with PROFESSIONALS both in and outside your profession. Making contacts in other professions will open up new markets for you to spread your brand far and wide.

Many frown at this, but offer pro bono and promotional services/products or barter with other professionals. Helping others in need of your services/products will generate hype about your business and promote your brand. Don’t offer free services/products too often and lose the ability to make a living because you’re known for rolling over at every sentimental appeal.

TIP 4 – Know Your Worth! Research what other professionals in your industry make for their services/products. Compete by not overpricing your products/services but don’t be the bottom rung of the ladder either. Be flexible! Provide multiple payment options for customers with various budgets (installments, deposits, etc.)

TIP 5 – INVEST IN YOURSELF! You should be enthusiastic about spending the money to design establish your brand. You can’t expect the cost to be cheap for designing a logo, business cards, websites & other marketing materials. Prepare to spend at least about $1000 – it’s a large investment, but worth it if you take time and FOLLOW THROUGH. Invest in accountants, business consultants and especially lawyers to help maintain and protect your brand. If you’re not willing to spend the money to build your brand, how can you expect your clients/customers to do so? Lastly, know your strengths and weaknesses. Don’t attempt things not within your skill set. Invest in tools to assist you.

I hope you enjoyed my 5 Tips! Put them to work as you build your brand, fulfill your dreams and Make Yourself!

Marketing vs. Public Relations: Clarification for the Confused


Marketing vs. public relations: Clarification for the confused

Dialogue 282x300 Marketing vs. public relations: Clarification for the confused

I see, time and time again, in professional articles and blog posts and hear in every day conversations the misuse of the terms marketing and public relations, and it annoys me.

But I admit I am not entirely innocent either. It’s really easy to mix up these two terms because they are complementary fields that share so many similarities. They are both public facing, require many of the same skill sets and share some methods of media and public engagement. However, it is important to understand that their goals and processes for reaching these goals are distinct.

Boiled down to its bare bones, the answer is quite simple. The goal of marketing is to determine the customers that a company should sell to and to devise a strategy on how to reach them. PR involves creating a purpose-driven, active dialogue with a target audience, whether it’s potential customers, employees or stakeholders, with the goal of developing visibility and a positive corporate image and reputation by relating it to its interest groups.  Consider marketing a “push” method of communication that involves designing and developing products and methods to sell a business services or products.  In contrast, PR is “pull” method of communication that creates a favorable public image (or brand) of a company that will attracted and secure clientele.

In defining PR and marketing, we must consider the fact that they are constantly evolving with the changing media landscape and increasing demands of consumers. And these consumers are becoming more powerful and vocal as social technology advances and dilutes the persuasive authority of businesses. These shifts make it challenging to pinpoint definitions for each field. Here are some attempts from reputable institutions:

Marketing defined

“Marketing is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.”

– American Marketing Association

“The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.”

– Chartered Institute of Marketing

  • The act or process of selling or purchasing in a market
  • The process or technique of promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service
  • An aggregate of functions involved in moving goods from producer to consumer

– Merriam-Webster dictionary

So, simply put, marketing is the business function that manages the relationships between an organization and its markets, between its products and services and its customers to satisfy all requirements profitably.

Public Relations defined

“Using the news or business press to carry positive stories about your company or your products; cultivating a good relationship with local press representatives”

– Entrepreneur Encyclopedia

“Public relations is about reputation – the result of what you do, what you say and what others say about you. Public Relations is the discipline which looks after reputation, with the aim of earning understanding and support and influencing opinion and behaviour. It is the planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain goodwill and mutual understanding between an organization and its publics”

– CIRP

“Public relations are often a crucial part of a company’s success – or failure. In addition to handling media requests, information queries and shareholder concerns, PR personnel are frequently responsible for crafting and maintaining a corporation’s image”

– Investopedia

Again, in its simplest form, PR seeks to foster a mutual understanding between an organization and its publics by bridging consistent communication lines with media and publics to make an organizations “good works” well known to as many publics as possible.

Similarities

As mentioned previously, public relations and marketing are complementary. When a mutual understanding between a business and its publics is fostered through PR, a marketer’s job is made easier. The same is true for public relations professionals when the market fit for a product or service is clearly understood by the marketing team. A lot of professionals, ourselves included, regard PR as a subset of marketing. You can agree or disagree with this viewpoint (We welcome your comments in the box just a little south of here).

Skill sets

PR and marketing professionals both require similar skill sets to perform their jobs successfully. Writing skills are essential to both fields. We have written extensively on the subject of writing, including why spelling and grammar count, the importance of being able to write a clear and persuasive mission statement, the delightful, frustrating and fulfilling struggle that is the art of writing and guidance on how to improve your writing all to double-underscore and highlight its importance to both PR and marketing professionals. In addition, both fields require excellent interpersonal and communications skills as they require you to engage with all manner of publics including customers, stakeholders, clients, journalists, editors, bloggers, brand enthusiasts and pessimists. Both professionals must also be excellent researchers and be able to identify credible and relevant information and apply it to projects. For these reasons, as well as the increasing demand for social media expertise, both professionals must also be technologically savvy. Teamwork, persistence and creativity also rank high among necessary skills required for each field.

Methods

Both professionals also carry similar tool kits to achieve their goals. For example, marketing and PR professionals both develop and carry out strategies for media relations with the primary goal being coverage that is cumulative and long term. New media, press releases and newswire services, media kits, email and the good old fashioned telephone are all employed to get their messages across to the media. Both also manage the reputation of their clients by monitoring the media and Internet for positive and negative mentions and often draft responses on behalf of clients to potentially damaging remarks as a means of reputation management. Of course, these just scrape the surface of the many strategies and tactics in the PR and marketing professionals’ toolkit. Feel free to add additional similarities to the comments section below as you think of them.

Differences

In our view, what sets marketing apart from PR is that it’s about more than just outreach; it also embraces a number of higher functions that determine the very direction of an organization. While they both focus on reaching target audiences for their corporate clients, marketers are responsible for identifying these groups and their specific needs that the company’s products can address. They are also responsible for distinguishing their products from competitors and for advising on the development of new products. They decide the markets that will optimize the company’s profits and provide council on product pricing based on a perceived value. Like PR, marketing requires communications skills, but it also demands more strategic and analytical skills.

So, what’s your take?

Don’t forget, with the new joint venture with B-EZ Graphix and Fresh Touch Publicity, you can resolve all of your marketing and PR needs in one network!

Top 5 Tips to Increase Fans on Facebook Fan Page


When you make a website or blog, you use Facebook to market your product. Well, this certainly helps when you posts your articles on the social media site and then creating a Facebook Fan Page.

Here I enlist the tips for generating more traffic to your blog.

Facebook Ads

When you use the ads of Facebook, it aptly works fine to get more fans since it only targets those people who seem interested in your product. The chances become bright that the person who views your ad, will become your fan. Advertising on Facebook is quite easy by opening its Advertising page.

Facebook Ads Fan Page

Facebook Fan Box on Your Blog/Website

Do use the Fan Box of Facebook on your website or blog. This is the most important tool. By using it, you will get number of fans and once your fans start increasing your website will start getting noticed in search engines. You can get its embed code from your Facebook account.

Facebook Fan Box on Your BlogWebsite Pages

Pages Tagging in your Updates

Tag your fan page whenever you update your Facebook Fan Page’s status.

Tagging in your Updates Facebook Fan Page

Mention of ‘Follow Me On Facebook’

This thing is quite easy and much effective method of increasing your fans on Facebook page. By the end of your post,  leave a clickable link requesting the viewers to become a fan of your Facebook Fan Page.

Mention of ‘Follow Me On Facebook’ Facebook Fan Page

Contests on Website

This helps a lot when you create the contests and giveaways on your site. Put some requirements to enter into the contest and post it on your site. A number of prominent websites do it and get more fans in return.

There are many other tips as well but these ones are proved ones to get more fans to your Facebook Page.

Contests on Website Facebook Fan Page

The Battle for Your Business: Graphic Designer vs. Web Designer


Every company needs to the help of a designer, but deciding what kind of designer is sometimes confusing. Companies often take a guess when it comes to hiring a designer, but as it turns out there is a difference between someone who works with websites and someone who works with graphics. If you want to make sure that you hire the right person for the job, it’s important you know exactly what you need done so you can evaluate which position is really qualified.

And in Corner One We Have: Graphic Design

write

Graphic design deals with creating images and graphics to illustrate an idea. Their designs are typically seen on more traditional forms of marketing mediums such as a brochure, billboard, or banner. However, although graphic designers do not deal with any type of programming, they can create graphics for someone else to place on the web. Consider some of the instances you would need to hire a graphic designer:

  • Logo Design – Branding has become critical to the success of a company. A good logo is memorable, easy to recognize at first glance, and expresses the overall meaning of the company. In other words, creating a logo is tricky. Graphic designers know how to create a logo that encompasses all of these important factors, so many companies find that hiring a graphic designer is a must.
  • Special Promotion Announcement – Graphic designers are the ones you hire to create something that will catch a reader’s eye. If you are hoping to create a special billboard or announcement in a brochure, a graphic designer should be able to come up with something great.

promotion

  • Infographics – Graphic designers will be able to design a visually interested infographic. According to Jungle Minds Digital Consultancy, 87% of people who saw an infographic stopped to read the accompanying text (only 41% of people read the text when there was no infographic). In other words, it’s a great idea to spend the extra money and make sure your infographic is perfect. Although the graphic designer may not be able to transfer the graphic onto the web, they will certainly be able to illustrate something with a nice, clean layout.

And Ready in Corner Two We Have: Web Design

web design
A web designer also has a keen sense of style and artistic ability, but they work more on the technical side of design. They are generally more basic in their styles, but this is often because they have to account for the transfer of a design onto a website. In other words, they must worry about things like screen resolution, speed, and file size. They also know a lot of about programming, such as HTML and CSS style, and can create websites using this knowledge. Consider some of the occasions you would want to hire a web designer:

  • Website Creation – This is the most obvious. If you want the layout of your website to look different and you need someone to make it happen (not just give you an idea), then a web designer is your best bet.
  • User Experience – Companies often discover that they need to improve the navigation on their websites because people are having a difficult time moving from page to page. It is the job of a web designer to help fix this problem through better internal linking and breadcrumbs.

user

  • Responsive Web Design – This is going to be one of the big changes for companies in 2012. As more and more consumers start surfing the web on mobile phones and tablets such as the IPad, websites will need to be modified to fit these screens. This is called “responsive web design,” and a web designer will be the man or woman for that job.

In many cases, companies need both a graphic designer and a web designer. The graphic designer works well for the initial idea and design, and a web designer does a good job brining that design to life on a website. In addition, companies should be utilizing both a website and traditional, print marketing strategies, so both will be necessary.

After learning about the differences between a web and a graphic designer, it’s easy to see why it’s an important distinction. A web designer will likely not be able to give you the creative, detailed designs for a billboard like a graphic designer will, and a graphic designer will likely not be able to transfer anything onto the web.  For this reason, it is important you hire the right person for the job, and in some cases this may mean hiring two separate designers.

Lucky for you, I have extensive skills in both graphic and web design – a one stop shop for all your company’s design needs.  Learn more about how I can help on the rest of my website.  In the meantime, thanks for visiting and thanks for reading.

 

Be easy,

Brian

 

Photo Credit: faveurink.com,2dayblog.com, reliablenetworks.co.uk, fortmyerswebdesign.org

Inspiring Use of Animal Logos


Do you want a catchy animal logo? A skillfully designed logo will surely grasp the attention of the viewers and at the same time will serve the purpose of giving a mark and identification to the company name for which the logo is made. My focus here is on animal logos as I have researched that animals are symbolic reflecting various organizations and businesses. They can also be related to animal welfare organizations and not just athletic teams.

Some cool animal logos are set by the name of the animal or birds as the case may be. Lightswitch brand and motion design is associated with light bulbs, switches, lighters, matchboxes etc. The fish is made to animate and the logo is designed such that it can work on medium as well as larger sizes. Gatto picante shows a spicy black cat and you will love the style. Al-Kaabi shows an elephant with dark brown color with a good font and overall design.

The Perceptive owl is a fantastic work illustrating a wise owl. The choice of colors is good and can easily be your favorite. Silent Monkey looks a quite funny character but the concept is good. Toro bull is really artistic and the use of colors is great with a Spanish feel. Girafrica v3 is unique in its design and the subtleness of text is great. Plastic whale showing a green and yellow color whale is interesting. Tacowaco shows a kind of a turtle and the ending is like a snake. Answer Financial® Inc. helps people to become smart shoppers in terms of insurance to get a better return of dollars. The logo depicts a green owl.

Monkey business is a logo designed for online jobs which are UK based. The pigs and pinot logo commemorates the first annual gathering of pigs and pinot. Tullamore estate logo is meant for Australian winery. Buffalo Stampede logo has been created for a hockey club. Woof logo depicts a dog head which is actually a mobile. Some other cool animal logos are Sylion which is created for a developing company. Sheeple logo has been shaped with a creepy kind of face and looks like sheep wearing humans. Albino Rhino logo has been made for firms of freelance designing. The tiger fish logo has a sharp finish and can be used for anything productive. All the below logos are inspiring and exhibit a unique representation.

Animal Logo Design Examples

                                              

Source: http://designmodo.com/animal-logos/#ixzz1jke7KeaY

The Psychology of Color in Logo Design


Color can be an important visual communications device that can intimately affect the psychology of the observer on a subconscious level. It can help determine a consumer’s relationship with a given product or company and play an important role in branding.

Color can evoke a wide variety of emotion and even memories. An individual’s interpretation of color will depend on factors like their age, nationality, profession, interests, and personal preference.

It therefore can’t be stated strongly enough that to use color effectively, you must completely understand your target audience.

For example, when faced with a new product, consumers place color and visual appearance (93%) above other factors such as texture (6%) and sound and smell (1%). It’s also interesting to note that 85% of shoppers cite color among the main reasons for why they buy a product.

And other studies have shown that color increases brand recognition by as much as 80%. That’s an amazing statistic when you consider that branding relates directly to customer confidence.

You’d be wise to consider the ramifications of color when designing a logo. Here’s a basic guide to the psychology of color…

color logo

Red

Red is the perfect color to get people excited and to draw attention. In fact, cognitive studies have shown that the first two colors that the brain processes are red and yellow. Red can be used to create a sense of urgency and actually increases the heart rate of the viewer.

Conveys: excitement, passion, strength, sex, aggressiveness, boldness, speed, desire, courage, determination, lust, impulse, action, danger, hard, angular, rigid.

Pink

It’s interesting to note that while red is the color of action and aggression, pink is one of the most calming of all colors. In fact criminals are sometimes housed in pink cells because studies have shown that the color pink reduces anger and aggression. Spiritualists consider pink to be a higher frequency color moving one toward enlightenment, and pink appeals to more traditional buyers.

Conveys: love, romance, soft, calm, serenity, cool, tranquility, motionless, unperturbed, fantasy, tradition.

Blue

Blue creates a sense of trust and security. Blue also has a very long wavelength and can be seen from far away. It’s why most airport landing lights are blue. But different shades of blue can have a different impact. Royal blue for example, appeals to impulse shoppers and is great for clearance sales, while navy blue appeals more to budget shoppers, and is better for institutional and corporate logos. More people cite blue as their favorite color over any other.

Conveys trust, reliability, belonging, coolness, dependable, trustworthy, friendly, calm, tranquility, serenity, water, seriousness, power, success, professionalism.

Yellow

Yellow is often used to grab the attention of window shoppers, It conveys a sense of optimism and youthfulness. It is a color associated with food. Yellow appeals to intellectuals and can enhance concentration though it can be hard to see if used improperly. The brain is stimulated to release more serotonin (natural feel-good chemical) when confronted with yellow. Yellow promotes and conveys creativity.

Conveys creativity, warmth, happiness, cheer, sunshine, youth, optimism, hope, food, stimulating, expansive, curiosity, playfulness, amusement, energy, comfort, laughter, good times

Green

Green is the color of nature, ecology and wealth. It’s the easiest color for the brain to process. Dark green appeals to the conservative, masculine, nature, while light green is commonly used in hospital rooms for its calming effect. Light green is also used in retail environments to promote calm, and is a popular food color. Use darker shades to represent stability and influence. Green can be associated with good luck, generosity, fertility and even jealousy and envy on the negative side.

Conveys Nature, peace, nurturing, harmony, recycling, good luck, fertility, generosity, envy, conservative, masculine, calmness, growth, abundance, healing, life, balance, rejuvenation, stability, influence.

Orange

Orange appeals to impulse shoppers and creates a call to action such as buying, selling or subscribing. Can be used to convey movement and energy without overpowering the viewer. Can convey a new attitude.

Conveys vibrant, energetic, friendly, inviting, warm, creativity, affordability, enthusiasm, playfulness, flamboyant, good times, adventure, attitude.

Purple

Young girls frequently select purple as their favorite color. It stimulates brain activity related to problem solving. It can lend an air of mystery, wisdom, and respect. Purple is the color of royalty and is often seen in anti-aging and beauty products. Darker shades can convey wealth and luxury while lighter shades convey spring and romance.

Conveys royalty, wealth, prosperity, mystery, respect, wisdom, problem solving, nobility, dignity, abundance, creativity, imagination, luxury, spring, romance, spirituality, justice, fantasy, dreams, feminine.

Black

Black is often used to market luxury products, It’s powerful and sleek and can be used to convey authority and power. Black is a serious color frequently associated with intelligence.

Conveys luxury, power, authority, evil, intelligence, elegance, seduction, mystery, modern, thin, sleek, formal, sophistication, secrecy.

Gray

Gray represents neutrality and calm. Not a great color in logo design but can be used to convey the timeless quality of things.

Conveys practical, neutral, timeless, middle-of-the-road, old age, death, taxes, lack of energy, stagnation, indifference.

Brown

Brown represents stability, experience and comfort. Also used to convey nature, friendship, reliability and the earth.

Conveys stability, nature, friendship, earth, tribal, primitive, simplicity, experience, comfort.

Study after study has shown that color conveys subconscious meaning, so color can be a powerful psychological tool in logo design. It can send a positive or negative message, encourage or discourage sales, promote or discourage trust, and even stimulate chemicals in the brain. The proper use of color can make or break your logo design.